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RDP more than two Simultaneous Access Limitations to Windows Server – Microsoft Q&A

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Wireshark User’s Guide.Remote desktop for more than 2 users in Windows Server R2 Standard – Microsoft Q&A

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Remote Desktop Services limits. This eliminates the needs to purchase Essential edition of Server Featured on Meta. Necessary Necessary. Text field cursor missing in RemoteApp. Time is money. That I am not sure of everywhere I have worked or contracted to has had their rdp in this way.
 
 

 

Windows server 2012 standard rdp limit free

 

IPv6 has to be installed and configured from the command line using the netsh interface ipv6 context as there is no GUI support. After the network interface’s link-local address is assigned, stateless autoconfiguration for local and global addresses can be performed by Windows XP. Static IPv6 addresses can be assigned if there is no IPv6 router on the local link.

Transition mechanisms such as manually configured tunnels and 6to4 can be set up. Privacy extensions are enabled and used by default. Teredo also helps traverse cone and restricted NATs. Teredo host-specific relay is enabled when a global IPv6 address has been assigned, otherwise Teredo client functionality is enabled.

An open source DHCPv6 implementation called Dibbler is available, [] although stateless autoconfiguration largely makes it unnecessary. Windows XP includes the Background Intelligent Transfer Service, a Windows service that facilitates prioritized, throttled, and asynchronous transfer of files between machines using idle network bandwidth.

BITS constantly monitors network traffic for any increase or decrease in network traffic and throttles its own transfers to ensure that other foreground applications such as a web browser get the bandwidth they need. BITS also supports resuming transfers in case of disruptions. BITS version 1. From version 1. Windows XP components such as Windows Update use BITS to download updates so only idle bandwidth is used to download updates and downloading can be resumed in case network connectivity is interrupted.

BITS uses a queue to manage file transfers and downloads files on behalf of requesting applications asynchronously, i. The transfer will continue in the background as long as the network connection is there and the job owner is logged in. If a network application begins to consume more bandwidth, BITS decreases its transfer rate to preserve the user’s interactive experience, except for Foreground priority downloads.

Windows XP has a Fax Console to manage incoming, outgoing and archived faxes and settings. The Fax Monitor only appears in the notification area when a fax transmission or reception is in progress. If manual reception of faxes is enabled, it appears upon an incoming fax call. It operates over IPv6.

PNRP : This provides dynamic name publication and resolution of names to endpoints. PNRP is a distributed name resolution protocol allowing Internet hosts to publish “peer names” and corresponding IPv6 addresses and optionally other information. Other hosts can then resolve the peer name, retrieve the corresponding addresses and other information, and establish peer-to-peer connections. With PNRP, peer names are composed of an “authority” and a “qualifier”. The authority is identified by a secure hash of an associated public key , or by a place-holder the number zero if the peer name is “unsecured”.

The qualifier is a string , allowing an authority to have different peer names for different services. If a peer name is secure, the PNRP name records are signed by the publishing authority, and can be verified using its public key. Unsecured peer names can be published by anybody, without possible verification. Multiple entities can publish the same peer name.

For example, if a peer name is associated with a group, any group member can publish addresses for the peer name. Peer names are published and resolved within a specified scope. The scope can be a local link, a site e. Each peer in the overlay network corresponds to a node in the graph. Nodes are resolved to addresses using PNRP. All the nodes in a graph share book-keeping information responsible for the functioning of the network as a whole. For example, in a distributed resource management network, which node has what resource needs to be shared.

Such information is shared as Records , which are flooded to all the peers in a graph. Each peer stores the Record to a local database. A Record consists of a header and a body. The body contains data specific to the application that is using the API; the header contains metadata to describe the data in the body as name-value pairs serialized using XML , in addition to author and version information. It can also contain an index of the body data, for fast searching. A node can connect to other nodes directly as well, for communication that need not be shared with the entire Graph.

A Group can be shared by multiple applications, unlike a Graph. All Records exchanged are digitally signed. Peers must be invited into a Group.

The invitation contains the GMC that enables it to join the group. Windows XP introduces a more simplified form of sharing files with local users in a multi-user environment and over the network called Simple File Sharing. By checking the Make this folder private option in its Properties, local Administrators are also denied permissions to the My Documents folder.

Simple File Sharing disables granular local and network sharing permissions. It shares the item with the Everyone group on the network with read only or write access, without asking for a password but forcing Guest user permissions. This newer client works as a system service at the network-redirector level immediately above the file-system , allowing WebDAV shares to be assigned to a drive letter and used by any software, even through firewalls and NATs.

Applications can open remote files on HTTP servers, edit the file, and save the changes back to the file if the server allows. The WebDAV mini-redirector is known to have some limitations in authentication support. Although Windows XP did not ship with the following major Windows features out-of-the-box, these new features can be added to Windows XP by downloading these components which were incorporated in later versions of Windows.

Beginning with Windows XP SP2, the audio volume taper is stored in the registry for on-screen keyboard and remote control applications and can be customized by third parties, [] and Internet Explorer has improved Group Policy settings support beyond security settings. There is IEEE For mass storage devices, Windows XP introduces hardware descriptors to distinguish between various storage types so that the operating system can set an appropriate default write caching policy.

Device Manager provides a configuration setting whether to optimize devices for quick removal or for performance. As mentioned in the above section , Windows XP includes improved support for FireWire cameras and audio video devices. Direct memory access over the bus from the host to the target allows kernel debugging over FireWire.

It is intended to prevent an application or service from executing code from a non-executable memory region. This helps prevent certain exploits that store code via a buffer overflow , for example. Software-enforced DEP does not protect from execution of code in data pages, but instead from another type of attack SEH overwrite. If DEP is enabled for all applications , users gain additional resistance against zero-day exploits. Therefore, DEP is not enforced for all applications by default in bit versions of Windows and is only turned on for critical system components.

Windows XP Service Pack 3 introduces additional NX APIs [] that allow software developers to enable NX hardware protection for their code, independent of system-wide compatibility enforcement settings. Developers can mark their applications as NX-compliant when built, which allows protection to be enforced when that application is installed and runs.

This enables a higher percentage of NX-protected code in the software ecosystem on bit platforms, where the default system compatibility policy for NX is configured to protect only operating system components.

Like Internet Connection Sharing, the firewall has a location-aware policy, meaning it can be disabled in a corporate domain but enabled for a private home network. It has an option to disallow all exceptions which may be useful when connecting to a public network. The firewall can also be used as the edge firewall for ICS clients. When the firewall blocks a program, it displays a notification. It supports port mapping and ICMP. Security log capabilities are included, which can record IP addresses and other data relating to connections originating from the home or office network or the Internet.

It can record both dropped packets and successful connections. This can be used, for instance, to track every time a computer on the network connects to a website. Windows Firewall also supports configuration through Group Policy.

Windows Security Center provides users with the ability to view the status of computer security settings and services. Windows Security Center also continually monitors these security settings, and informs the user via a pop-up notification balloon if there is a problem. The Windows Security Center consists of three major components: A control panel , a Windows Service , and an application programming interface that is provided by Windows Management Instrumentation.

The control panel divides the monitored security settings into categories, the headings of which are displayed with color-coded backgrounds. The current state of these settings is determined by the Windows service which starts automatically when the computer starts, and takes responsibility for continually monitoring the system for changes.

The settings are made available to the system through a WMI provider. Anti-malware and firewall software vendors can register with the Security Center through the WMI provider.

Windows Update settings and status are also monitored and reported. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article relies too much on references to primary sources. Please improve this by adding secondary or tertiary sources. New features added in Windows XP. Main article: ClearType. Animation showing the difference in font rendering with normal antialiasing vs. ClearType The frame showing the latter is marked with an orange circle. Main article: Windows thumbnail cache.

Main article: AutoPlay. Main article: Text Services Framework. Main article: Microsoft-specific exception handling mechanisms. Main article: Prefetcher. Main article: System Restore.

Main article: Automated System Recovery. Main article: Side-by-side assembly. Main article: Windows Error Reporting. Main article: Windows Movie Maker. Main article: Windows Media Center. Main article: DirectShow. Main article: Windows Script Host. Main article: Remote Assistance. Main article: Fast user switching. See also: Winlogon. Main article: Windows Installer. Main article: Disk Defragmenter Windows. Main article: Windows Task Manager. Main article: Windows Management Instrumentation.

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. January Main article: Encrypting File System. Main article: Wireless Zero Configuration. Main article: Internet Connection Sharing. Main article: IPv6. Main article: Background Intelligent Transfer Service. Main article: Peer Name Resolution Protocol. Main article: Bluetooth stack. Main article: Data Execution Prevention. Main article: Windows Firewall. Main article: Windows Security Center. XP Vista 7 8 10 Archived from the original on Retrieved Archived from the original on December 6, Visual Studio.

NET documentation. Archived from the original on 9 April Retrieved 4 April Archived from the original on December 13, MSDN Magazine. Microsoft Windows Internals 4th ed. Microsoft Press. ISBN February 4, Sams Publishing published Microsoft Technet. April 1, Archived from the original on July 18, Retrieved July 18, April 14, Archived from the original on April 30, No personal information, such as network name or password, is collected.

Depending on your device installation settings, when Windows installs shared devices, Windows might send some information to Microsoft and install device software on your PC. For more information, see the Device Installation section. The information sent to Microsoft about your network is used to determine which devices on the network should be installed automatically. If you choose enable sharing and connect to devices when you join a network, network discovery is turned on for that network.

You can choose whether to enable network discovery at all and whether to enable automatic setup of network connected devices by selecting Change advanced sharing settings in Network and Sharing Center.

Wi—Fi Direct is a wireless technology that allows devices to communicate directly with each other, without needing to connect to a Wi—Fi network. Depending on your device installation settings, when Windows pairs with wireless devices, Windows might send some information to Microsoft and install device software on your PC. DirectAccess enables your PC to remotely and seamlessly connect to your workplace network whenever your PC is connected to the Internet, no matter your location.

Each time you start your PC, DirectAccess will attempt to connect to your workplace network, whether or not you’re physically located at your workplace. Once connected, your PC will download workplace policy, and you’ll be able to access configured resources in the workplace network. Your workplace administrator might leverage DirectAccess connectivity to remotely manage and monitor your PC, including the websites you visit even when you aren’t physically located at your workplace.

DirectAccess must be configured by your workplace administrator using Group Policy. While your administrator can allow you to temporarily deactivate some elements of DirectAccess, only your workplace administrator can stop Windows from attempting to connect to your workplace for management purposes. If you or your workplace administrator removes your PC from your workplace domain, DirectAccess will no longer be able to connect. Dynamic Update enables Windows to perform a one-time check with Windows Update to get the latest updates for your PC while Windows is being installed.

If updates are found, Dynamic Update automatically downloads and installs them so your PC is up to date the first time that you sign in or use it.

To install compatible drivers, Dynamic Update sends information to Microsoft about your PC’s hardware. The types of updates Dynamic Update can download to your PC include:. Installation updates. Important software updates for installation files to help ensure a successful installation. In-box driver updates. Important driver updates for the version of Windows that you’re installing. Dynamic Update reports information to Microsoft about your PC’s hardware to help identify the correct drivers for your system.

For more information about how information collected by Dynamic Update is used, see the Update Services Privacy Statement. The Ease of Access Center enables you to turn on accessibility options and settings to help you more easily interact with the PC. This information is saved in a non-human-readable format and stored locally on your PC.

A set of configuration recommendations are provided to you based on the statements that you choose. You can choose which statements you would like to select by going to Ease of Access in Control Panel. You can alter your choices at any time. You can also choose which of the recommendations you want to configure on your PC. PC users, primarily administrators, can use Event Viewer to view and manage event logs.

Event logs contain information about hardware, software, and security events on your PC. You can also get information from Microsoft about events in the event logs by clicking Event Log Online Help. Event logs contain event information generated by all users and apps on the PC. By default, all users can view event log entries; however, administrators can choose to restrict access to event logs.

You can access the event logs for your PC by opening Event Viewer. If you use Event Log Online Help to look up additional information about a specific event, information about the event is sent to Microsoft. When you use Event Log Online Help to look up information about an event, the event data sent from your PC is used to locate and provide you with additional information about the event. For Microsoft events, the event details will be sent to Microsoft.

For events associated with third-party apps, the information will be sent to the location specified by the third-party publisher or manufacturer. If you send information about events to third-party publishers or manufacturers, use of the information will be subject to each third party’s privacy practices. Administrators can choose to restrict access to Event Viewer logs.

Users who have full access to event viewer logs can clear them. Unless you have previously consented to sending event information automatically when you click Event Log Online Help, you’ll be asked to confirm that the information presented to you can be sent over the Internet. No event log information will be sent over the Internet unless you consent to send it.

Administrators can use Group Policy to select or change the site to which event information is sent. Family Safety helps parents protect their children when they use a PC.

Parents can control which apps, games, and websites children are allowed to use. Parents can also set time limits and receive regular activity reports via email. Parents can manage restrictions and view activity reports locally on the PC or online using the Microsoft Family Safety website. Activity reports can include info about time spent using the computer, time spent in individual apps and games, and websites visited including attempts to view blocked sites. Administrators on the PC can change settings and view the activity report.

A parent can allow other people to view activity reports and change settings by adding them as parents on the Microsoft Family Safety website. If the parent configuring Family Safety is signed into Windows with a Microsoft account, online management is automatically enabled. Windows and the Microsoft Family Safety website use the information collected to provide the Family Safety feature. Family Safety is turned off by default. Only administrators can turn on Family Safety, and only users without administrative privileges can be monitored or restricted.

If Family Safety is turned on, the child will receive a notification that Family Safety is monitoring their account each time they sign in to Windows. If you indicate that an account is a child account during account creation, you can choose to enable Family Safety for that account. Parent accounts can be added or removed on the Microsoft Family Safety website.

To properly use Family Safety, only parents should be administrators of their PC, and children should not be granted administrative privileges. Please note that using this feature to monitor other users such as adults may violate applicable law.

The fax feature allows you to create and save fax cover pages, and to send and receive faxes using your PC and an external or a built-in fax modem or a fax server. By default, Windows uses “Fax” as the value for each identifier. Information entered in the sender dialog box is presented on the fax cover page. Fax access is determined by your user account privileges on the PC. Unless a fax administrator changes access settings, all users can send and receive faxes. By default, all users can view the documents that they send and any fax that is received on the PC.

Administrators can see all faxed documents, sent or received, and can configure fax settings, including who has permissions to view or manage faxes, and the TSID and CSID values. Automatic learning is a handwriting recognition personalization tool that is available on PCs with touch or tablet pen.

This feature collects data about the words that you use and how you write them. This helps the handwriting recognition software recognize and improve its interpretation of your handwriting style and vocabulary and also improves auto correction and text suggestions for languages without input method editors IMEs.

Information collected by automatic learning is stored in the user profile for each user on the PC. Text from messages you compose and calendar entries you create by using email apps for example, Office Outlook or Windows Live Mail including any messages that you have already sent. Recognized text from ink that you write in Input Panel or type on on-screen keyboards. The information collected is used to help improve handwriting recognition by creating a version of the recognition software that’s personalized to your own style and vocabulary, and to enable auto correction and text suggestions as you type on on-screen keyboards.

The text samples are used to create an extended dictionary. The ink samples are used to help improve character recognition for each user on a PC. Automatic learning is enabled by default. You can turn automatic learning on or off at any time by going to Advanced settings in Languages in Control Panel.

When you turn off automatic learning, any data that has been collected and stored by automatic learning is deleted. Windows allows you to easily link PCs on your home network so that you can share pictures, music, videos, documents, and devices. It also enables PCs to stream media to devices on your home network such as a media extender. These PCs and devices are your homegroup. You can help protect your homegroup with a password, and you can choose what you want to share.

You can access your own files, such as pictures, videos, music, and documents, from any PC in the homegroup. When you join a homegroup, account information including email address, display name, and picture for all Microsoft accounts on your PC will be shared with others in the homegroup in order to enable sharing with those users. The information collected allows PCs in your homegroup to understand who to share content with and how to present it. You have the ability to add or remove PCs from your homegroup and decide what is shared with other homegroup members.

You can create a homegroup and manage its settings by going to HomeGroup in PC settings. Depending on the IME you use, and your settings, the auto-tuning and text suggestion features of IME might record words or word sequences to improve the selection of the ideograms displayed. The IME auto-tuning self-learning and text suggestion features record a word or sequence of words and the frequency with which you use them. If you choose to send this data to Microsoft, it is used to improve IME and related products and services.

Except for the Simplified Chinese IME in which the prediction feature is off by default , the automatic learning and text suggestion features are on by default in those IMEs that support them.

The data collected isn’t sent automatically to Microsoft. You can choose whether or not to collect or send this data in Language in Control Panel. If errors in presenting ideograms or in converting keyboard input to ideograms occur, this feature can collect information about the errors that can help Microsoft improve its products and services. IME Conversion Error Reporting collects information about IME conversion errors, such as what you typed, the first conversion or prediction result, the string you chose instead, information about the IME you use, and information about how you use it.

In addition, if you use the Japanese IME, you can choose to include automatic learning information in conversion error reports. Microsoft uses the information to improve our products and services. After a certain number of conversion errors are stored, the Mis-Conversion Report Tool will ask whether you want to send a conversion error report.

You can view the information contained in each report before choosing whether to send it. You can also enable automatic sending of conversion error reports in IME Settings. Depending on the IME you use, you might be able to use word registration to report unsupported words words that might not be converted correctly to ideograms from keyboard input. Registration reports can include the information you provide in the Add Word dialog box about the words being reported, and the software version number for an IME.

These reports might include personal information, for example, if you add personal names using word registration. You have the opportunity to review the data being sent with each report before you choose to send it. Microsoft uses the information to help improve our products and services. You can view the information contained in the report before choosing whether to send it.

This feature sends a single report to Microsoft containing basic information about your PC and how you installed Windows 8. Microsoft uses this information to help improve the installation experience and to create solutions to common installation problems. The report generally includes information about your installation experience, such as the date of installation, the time it took for each installation phase to complete, whether the installation was an upgrade or a new installation of the product, version details, operating system language, media type, PC configuration, and success or failure status, along with any error codes.

If you choose to participate in the Installation Improvement Program, the report is sent to Microsoft when you’re connected to the Internet. The GUID lets us determine which data is sent from a particular computer over time. The GUID doesn’t contain any personal information and isn’t used to identify you. Microsoft and our partners use the report to help improve our products and services. You can choose to participate in this program when you install Windows 8 by selecting I want to help make the installation of Windows better.

When you print using this feature, you must first connect and authenticate yourself to an Internet print server. The information that you’ll need to submit to the print server will vary depending on the level of security that the print server supports for example, you might be asked to provide a user name and password. The information collected enables you to print using remote printers. If you send information to a third-party print server, use of the information will be subject to the third party’s privacy practices.

You can enable or disable Internet printing by opening Programs and Features in Control Panel, and then selecting Turn Windows features on or off.

You can add the languages you prefer to use to your language list in Windows 8. Apps and websites appear in the first language available in that list. When you visit websites and install apps on your PC, your list of preferred languages is sent to the websites you visit and is available to the apps you use so they can provide content in your preferred languages. Microsoft doesn’t use any language information to identify or contact you.

Language information sent or used by third-party websites and apps is subject to the privacy practices of the third-party website or app publisher. Your list of preferred languages is available to the apps you install and websites you visit. You can add or remove languages from this list in Language preferences in Control Panel.

On PCs running Windows, “location services” refers to the Windows software and Microsoft online service that are used to determine the approximate physical location of your PC, which is provided to apps or websites that you allow to access it. For example, you can install devices such as a GPS receiver that might send location information directly to an app and entirely bypass the platform. Apps that are authorized to use the platform to determine your location could also transmit or store that information.

If you enable the Windows Location Platform, authorized apps will be able to access your location and use it to give you personalized content. If you choose to customize settings, you can control the Windows Location Platform by selecting Turn on Windows Location Platform so apps can ask users for their location under Share info with apps. Each user can control their own location settings for all apps in Privacy in PC settings.

In addition, administrators can choose to turn off the Windows Location Platform for all users in Location in Control Panel. The Windows Location Provider will first check to see if it has a list of Wi—Fi access points stored from a prior request by a location-aware app.

If there isn’t already a list of nearby Wi—Fi access points, or if the list is out of date, the provider sends information about nearby Wi—Fi access points and GPS information if available to the Microsoft Location Service. Windows Location Provider may also update its stored list of Wi—Fi access points.

This list of access points is encrypted when stored on disk so that apps can’t directly access it. The GPS information includes observed latitude, longitude, direction, speed, and altitude.

The information is used by the Windows Location Provider to give Windows Location Platform the approximate location of your PC when an authorized app requests it.

For more information about how to control whether apps can request your PC’s location, see the Windows Location Platform section. If you authorize apps to request your PC’s location, the cached list of nearby Wi-Fi access point locations that are encrypted and stored by the Windows Location Provider will be deleted and replaced periodically. If you choose express settings while setting up Windows, you choose to help improve the Microsoft Location Service.

If you choose to customize settings, you can control whether to help improve the Microsoft Location Service by selecting Help improve Microsoft services by sending some location data when location-aware apps are used under Send Microsoft info to help make Windows and apps better.

To provide personalized content, apps can request your name and account picture from Windows. Your name and account picture are displayed under Your account in Users in PC settings. If you sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, Windows will use the name and account picture associated with that account.

If you allow apps to access your name and account picture, Windows will provide that information to all apps that request it. Apps might store or transmit this information. If you sign in to Windows with a domain account, and you choose to allow apps to use your name and account picture, apps that can use your Windows credentials will be allowed to access certain other forms of your domain account information.

This information includes, for example, your user principal name like jack contoso. If you sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, or if you sign in to Windows with a domain account connected to a Microsoft account, Windows can automatically sync your account picture on your PC with your Microsoft account picture.

If you choose express settings while setting up Windows, Windows will allow apps to access your name and account picture. If you choose to customize settings, you can control access to your name and account picture by selecting Let apps use my name and account picture under Share info with apps. After setting up Windows, you can change this setting in Privacy in PC settings.

You can change your account picture in Personalize in PC settings. You can also choose to allow certain apps to change your account picture. If you have a subscription plan for network access for example, via a mobile broadband connection , this feature provides information about your subscription plan to apps and Windows features on your PC.

Windows features and apps can use this information to optimize their behavior. This feature also provides information about your network connection, such as signal strength and whether your PC is connected to the Internet.

This feature collects Internet and intranet network connectivity information, such as the Domain Name Service DNS suffix of your PC, network name, and gateway address of the networks that your PC connects to. This feature also receives subscription plan information such as the amount of data remaining in the plan. Network connectivity profiles can include a history of all networks visited and the date and time of the last connection. This feature can attempt to connect to a Microsoft server to determine whether you’re connected to the Internet.

The only data sent to Microsoft during network connectivity checks is standard PC information. If data is sent to Microsoft, it is only used to provide network connectivity status. Network connectivity status is made available to apps and features on your PC that request network connectivity information. If you use a third-party app, use of the information collected will be subject to the third party’s privacy practices. Network Awareness is on by default. Disabling this feature isn’t recommended because it will prevent some Windows features from functioning properly.

Windows Store apps can automatically receive content and display notifications in several ways. They can, for example, receive notifications that are displayed briefly in the corner of the screen or on app tiles if those tiles are pinned to Start. The lock screen can display detailed or brief status for certain apps as well.

App publishers can send content to your Windows Store apps through the Windows Push Notification Service running on Microsoft servers, or the apps can download information directly from third-party servers. Windows Store apps can deliver periodic or real-time information to you that will be displayed briefly as notifications in the corner of the screen.

Apps can display text, images, or both in notifications. The contents of notifications can be provided locally by the app for example, an alarm from a clock app.

Notifications can also be sent from an app’s online service through the Windows Push Notification Service for example, a social network update. Images displayed in notifications may be downloaded directly from a server specified by the app publisher; when that happens, standard computer information will be sent to that server. Microsoft only uses notification information to deliver notifications from your apps to you. You can turn off notifications for all apps or for individual apps in Notifications in PC settings.

Some apps can display status and notifications on the screen when your PC is locked. Lock screen apps could also transmit or process other information unrelated to notifications and updates. Windows uses the status and notification information provided by the lock screen apps to update the lock screen. After you set up Windows, the Mail, Calendar, and Messaging apps are automatically set as lock screen apps.

You can add or remove these or other apps from the lock screen in Personalize in PC Settings. You can also choose one app to persistently display detailed status for example, details for the next appointment on your calendar on the lock screen. You can control whether lock screen apps can display notifications on the lock screen in Notifications in PC settings.

Store apps that are pinned to Start can update their tiles with text, images, or both. If tile content is downloaded directly from a server specified by the app publisher, standard computer information will be sent to that server.

Microsoft only uses tile information to deliver tile updates from your apps to you. To clear the current updates displayed on your Start tiles, swipe from the right side or point to the upper right corner of Start, tap or click Settings , and then tap or click Tiles.

Tap or click the Clear button under Clear personal info from my tiles. Tile updates delivered after you clear the current updates will continue to appear. Order Prints enables you to send digital pictures stored on your PC or a network drive to an online photo printing service of your choice. Depending on the service, you can have your pictures printed and then delivered using postal mail or you can pick up the prints at a local store. If you decide to place an order with an online photo printing service, your digital photos are sent over the Internet to the service that you selected.

The file path to the digital pictures that you select which might include your user name might be sent to the service in order to allow the service to display and upload the images.

Digital picture files might contain data about the image that was stored with the file by the camera, such as the date and time that the picture was taken or the location where the picture was taken if your camera has GPS capabilities. The files might also contain personal information such as captions that might have been associated with the file through the use of digital picture management apps and Windows Explorer. For more information, see the Properties section below. Information you enter on the online photo printing services website is transmitted to the service.

The information stored in the digital picture files by the camera might be used by the online photo printing service during the printing process, for example, to adjust the color or sharpness of the image before it is printed.

Information stored by digital picture management apps might be used by the online photo printing service to print as captions on the front or back of the print copy. You can use Order Prints to choose which pictures to send and which service to use to print your pictures.

Some picture management apps might be able to help you remove stored personal information before sending pictures to be printed. You might also be able to edit the properties of the file to remove stored personal information. If an incompatibility problem is found with an app that you try to run, Program Compatibility Assistant will try to help you resolve it.

If an incompatibility problem is found with an app you attempt to run, a report is generated that includes information such as the app name, app version, the needed compatibility settings, and your actions with the app so far. Error reports are used to provide you with responses to problems that you report for your apps. Responses contain links when available to the app publisher’s website so you can learn more about possible solutions.

Error reports created due to app failures are used to try to determine which setting to adjust when you encounter compatibility problems for the apps that you’re running on this version of Windows.

Information reported through CEIP is used to identify app compatibility problems. For problems reported through Windows Error Reporting, an error report is created only when you select the option to check online for a solution.

Unless you have previously consented to report problems automatically so you can check for solutions, you’re asked if you want to send the error report. For more information, see the Windows Error Reporting section. Properties are file information that allow you to quickly search and organize your files. Some properties are intrinsic to the file for example, the size of the file while others might be specific to an app or device for example, the settings of your camera when you took a photo or the location data recorded by the camera for the photo.

The type of information stored will depend upon the type of file and the apps that use it. Examples of properties include file name, date modified, file size, author, keywords, and comments. Properties are stored in the file, and they move with the file if it is moved or copied to another location, such as a file share, or sent as an email attachment. Properties can help you more quickly search and organize your files.

They can also be used by apps to perform app-specific tasks. You can edit or remove some properties for a file by selecting the file in Windows Explorer and clicking Properties. For app-specific properties, you can edit or remove them only if the app used to generate the file supports these features. If your PC has near-field communication NFC hardware, you can physically tap it against another device with NFC hardware to share links, files, and other information.

There are two types of proximity connections: Tap and Do and Tap and Hold. With Tap and Hold, the connection is active only as long as the devices are held next to each other. When you tap proximity enabled devices together, they exchange information to establish a connection with each other. Depending on the way the devices are configured, this data can include Bluetooth and Wi—Fi network addresses, and the name of your PC.

Windows can send files, links, and other information between devices using a proximity connection. Apps that use proximity can send and receive any information they have access to. This information might be sent through your network or Internet connection, or directly through a device-to-device wireless connection. Network and PC information exchanged over a proximity connection is used to establish a network connection, and to identify the devices connecting to each other. Data transferred through a proximity connection initiated within an app can be used by that app in any way.

Near field proximity service is on by default. An administrator can disable it using the options provided in Devices and Printers in Control Panel. Windows Tap and Send makes it easy to share selected information with a friend standing next to you or with another one of your devices such as a mobile phone.

The next device you tap will receive a link to the webpage currently being displayed. This also works with any app that supports sharing information, such as pictures, text, or files. Tap and Send uses the information you’re sharing and the information described in the Near field proximity service section above. This information is only used to create the connection between the two devices.

If Near field proximity service is enabled, Tap and Send is also enabled. For more information, see the Near field proximity service section. VPN technologies allow users to connect to a private network, such as a corporate network, over the Internet. A Remote Access connections component, Dial-up Networking, allows you to access the Internet using a dial-up modem or broadband technology such as a cable modem or a digital subscriber line DSL.

The dialer components collect information from your PC such as your user name, password, and domain name. This information is sent to the system that you’re attempting to connect with. To help protect your privacy and the security of your PC, security-related information such as your user name and password are encrypted and stored on your PC. Dialer information is used to help your PC connect to the Internet.

A remote access server might keep the user name and IP address information for accounting and compliance purposes, but no information is sent to Microsoft. For non-command-line dialers, you can choose to save your password by selecting Save this user name and password. You can clear that option at any time to delete the previously saved password from the dialer.

Because this option is turned off by default, you might be prompted to provide your password to connect to the Internet or a network. For command-line dialers like rasdial, there is no option to save your password. RemoteApp and Desktop Connections let you access apps and desktops on remote PCs that have been made available online for remote access.

When you enable a connection, configuration files are downloaded to your PC from the remote URL you specify. These configuration files link apps and desktops on remote PCs so that you can run them from your PC. Your PC will automatically check for and download updates to these configuration files periodically. These apps run on remote PCs, and information you enter into the apps is transmitted across the network to the remote PCs you chose to connect with.

Updates to configuration files might include settings changes including providing you with access to new apps; however, new apps will run only if you choose to run them. This feature also sends information to the remote PCs on which the remote apps run. You can choose whether you want to use RemoteApp and Desktop Connections.

You can also use your email address to retrieve the Connection URL. You can remove a connection and its connection files by clicking Remove on the connections description dialog box.

If you disconnect a connection without closing all open apps, these apps will remain open on the remote PC. Remote Desktop connection provides a way for you to establish a remote connection with a host PC that is running Remote Desktop Services. These settings include the name of your domain and connection configuration settings, such as remote PC name, user name, display information, local device information, audio information, clipboard, connection settings, remote app names, and session icon or thumbnail.

Credentials for these connections, Remote Desktop Gateway credentials, and a list of trusted Remote Desktop Gateway server names are stored locally on your PC. This list is stored permanently unless it is deleted by an administrator. Information collected by Remote Desktop connection allows you to connect to host PCs running Remote Desktop Services using your preferred settings.

User name, password, and domain information are collected to allow you to save your connection settings and to enable you to double-click an RDP file or click a favorite to launch a connection without having to re-enter this information. You can choose if you want to use Remote Desktop connection. If you use it, your RDP files and Remote Desktop connection favorites contain information required to connect to a remote PC, including the options and settings that were configured when the connection was automatically saved.

You can customize RDP files and favorites, including files for connecting to the same PC with different settings. A Microsoft account formerly known as Windows Live ID is a single email address and password you can use as your sign-in info to sign in to apps, sites, and services from Microsoft and select Microsoft partners.

You can sign up for a Microsoft account in Windows or on Microsoft websites that require you to sign in with a Microsoft account. You have the opportunity to review the data being sent with each report before you choose to send it. Microsoft uses the information to help improve our products and services.

You can view the information contained in the report before choosing whether to send it. When you share your Internet connection for the first time, Windows will automatically generate and store a network name and password. You can change these at any time. Windows also syncs other information to let you remotely start Internet connection sharing from your other trusted devices. This information is used to set up Internet connection sharing. If you sign in to a device that supports Internet connection sharing with your Microsoft account, and you add the device as a trusted device, the information necessary to remotely start Internet connection sharing will be synced to OneDrive.

You can stop syncing the information by choosing not to sync passwords. For more info, see the “Sync settings” section of this page. When you print using this feature, you must first connect and authenticate yourself to an Internet print server. The information that you’ll need to submit to the print server will vary depending on the level of security that the print server supports for example, you might be asked to provide a user name and password. The information collected enables you to print using remote printers.

If you send information to a third-party print server, use of the information will be subject to the third party’s privacy practices. You can turn Internet printing on or off by opening Programs and Features in Control Panel, and then selecting Turn Windows features on or off. You can add the languages you prefer to use to your language list in Windows 8. Apps and websites appear in the first language available in that list.

When you visit websites and install apps on your PC, your list of preferred languages is sent to the websites you visit and is available to the apps you use so they can provide content in your preferred languages. Microsoft doesn’t use any language information to identify or contact you.

Language information sent or used by third-party websites and apps is subject to the privacy practices of the third-party website or app publisher. Your list of preferred languages is available to the apps you install and websites you visit. You can add or remove languages from this list in Language preferences in Control Panel. Windows location services consist of two components. Windows Location Provider connects to a Microsoft online service to determine your location.

If you let an app use your location, in addition to providing your location while you use the app, Windows Location Platform can tell the app when your PC moves inside or outside of app-defined geographical boundaries.

For example, an app could let you set a reminder to pick up groceries when you leave work. For example, you can install devices such as a GPS receiver that might send location information directly to an app and bypass the platform. Regardless of your Windows Location Platform settings, online services can use your IP address to determine its approximate location—usually the city your PC is in.

If an app sets up geographical boundaries to monitor, those boundaries are stored encrypted on your PC. The information stored about these boundaries includes a name, a location, and whether your PC was inside or outside the boundary the last time its location was determined. Apps that set up geographical boundaries might transmit or store this information. If you choose to customize settings, you can control the Windows Location Platform by selecting Let Windows and apps request my location from the Windows Location Platform under Share info with Microsoft and other services.

Each user can control their own location settings for apps in Privacy in PC settings. In addition, administrators can choose to turn off the location platform for all users in Location Settings in Control Panel.

To prevent apps from being notified when geographic boundaries defined by apps are crossed, an administrative user can turn off the Windows Location Framework Service in Control Panel. This list of access points is encrypted when stored on disk so that apps can’t directly access it. The GPS information includes observed latitude, longitude, direction, speed, and altitude.

The information is used by the Windows Location Provider to give Windows Location Platform the approximate location of your PC when an authorized app requests it. For more info about how to control whether apps can request your PC’s location, see the Windows Location Platform section. If you choose express settings while setting up Windows, you choose to help improve the Microsoft Location Service. If you choose to customize settings, you can control whether to help improve the Microsoft Location Service by selecting Send some location data to Microsoft when location-aware apps are used under Help improve Microsoft products and services.

Windows lets you connect Windows Store apps to accounts you use for websites. When an app asks for credentials to sign in to a website, you can choose to save those credentials. The credentials are stored encrypted on your PC. For more info about how these and other credentials may be synced to OneDrive, see the “Sync settings” section of this page. Windows only uses the saved credentials to help you sign in to the websites you have selected.

If you save credentials while connecting an app to a website, the saved credentials won’t be used in Internet Explorer or other apps. You can manage saved credentials in Credential Manager in Control Panel. For more information about how these and other credentials may be synced to OneDrive, see the “Sync settings” section of this page. To provide personalized content, apps can request your name and account picture from Windows. Your name and account picture are displayed under Your account in Accounts in PC settings.

If you sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, Windows will use the name and account picture associated with that account. If you allow apps to access your name and account picture, Windows will provide that information to all apps that request it.

If you sign in to Windows with a domain account, and you choose to allow apps to use your name and account picture, apps that can use your Windows credentials will be allowed to access certain other forms of your domain account information. This information includes, for example, your user principal name like jack contoso.

If you sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, or if you sign in to Windows with a domain account connected to a Microsoft account, Windows can automatically sync your account picture on your PC with your Microsoft account picture. If you choose express settings while setting up Windows, Windows will allow apps to access your name and account picture. If you choose to customize settings, you can control access to your name and account picture by selecting Let apps use my name and account picture under Share info with Microsoft and other services.

After setting up Windows, you can turn change this setting in Privacy in PC settings. You can change your account picture in Accounts in PC settings. You can also choose to allow certain apps to change your account picture. If you have a subscription plan for network access for example, via a mobile broadband connection , this feature provides information about your subscription plan to apps and Windows features on your PC.

Windows features and apps can use this information to optimize their behavior. This feature also provides information about your network connection, such as signal strength and whether your PC is connected to the Internet. This feature collects Internet and intranet network connectivity information, such as the Domain Name Service DNS suffix of your PC, network name, and gateway address of the networks that your PC connects to.

This feature also receives subscription plan information such as the amount of data remaining in the plan. Network connectivity profiles can include a history of all networks visited and the date and time of the last connection. This feature can attempt to connect to a Microsoft server to determine whether you’re connected to the Internet.

The only data sent to Microsoft during network connectivity checks is standard PC information. If data is sent to Microsoft, it is only used to provide network connectivity status. Network connectivity status is made available to apps and features on your PC that request network connectivity information. If you use a third-party app, use of the information collected will be subject to the third party’s privacy practices.

Network Awareness is on by default. An administrator can turn it off using the Services options in Administrative Tools in Control Panel. Disabling this feature isn’t recommended because it will prevent some Windows features from functioning properly.

Windows Store apps can automatically receive content and display notifications in several ways. They can, for example, receive notifications that are displayed briefly in the corner of the screen or on app tiles if those tiles are pinned to Start. The lock screen can display detailed or brief status for certain apps as well.

App publishers can send content to your Windows Store apps through the Windows Push Notification Service running on Microsoft servers, or the apps can download information directly from third-party servers. Windows Store apps can deliver periodic or real-time information to you that will be displayed briefly as notifications in the corner of the screen.

Apps can display text, images, or both in notifications. The contents of notifications can be provided locally by the app for example, an alarm from a clock app. Notifications can also be sent from an app’s online service through the Windows Push Notification Service for example, a social network update. Images displayed in notifications may be downloaded directly from a server specified by the app publisher; when that happens, standard computer information will be sent to that server. Microsoft only uses notification information to deliver notifications from your apps to you.

Some Windows Store apps can display status and notifications on the screen when your PC is locked. Lock screen apps can also perform tasks while the PC is locked, such as syncing email in the background or letting you answer incoming phone calls.

You can also use your PCs camera directly from the lock screen. Lock screen apps could also transmit or process other information unrelated to notifications and updates. Windows uses the status and notification information provided by the lock screen apps to update the lock screen. After you set up Windows, the Mail, Calendar, and Skype apps are automatically set as lock screen apps.

You can also choose one app to persistently display detailed status for example, details for the next appointment on your calendar on the lock screen. Store apps that are pinned to Start can update their tiles with text, images, or both. If tile content is downloaded directly from a server specified by the app publisher, standard computer information will be sent to that server.

Microsoft only uses tile information to deliver tile updates from your apps to you. To clear the current updates displayed on your Start tiles, swipe from the right side or point to the upper right corner of Start, tap or click Settings , and then tap or click Tiles. Tap or click the Clear button under Clear personal info from my tiles.

Tile updates delivered after you clear the current updates will continue to appear. Order Prints enables you to send digital pictures stored on your PC or a network drive to an online photo printing service of your choice. Depending on the service, you can have your pictures printed and then delivered using postal mail or you can pick up the prints at a local store. If you decide to place an order with an online photo printing service, your digital photos are sent over the Internet to the service that you selected.

The file path to the digital pictures that you select which might include your user name might be sent to the service in order to allow the service to display and upload the images. Digital picture files might contain data about the image that was stored with the file by the camera, such as the date and time that the picture was taken or the location where the picture was taken if your camera has GPS capabilities.

The files might also contain personal information such as captions that might have been associated with the file through the use of digital picture management apps and File Explorer. For more information, see the Properties section below. Information you enter on the online photo printing services website is transmitted to the service.

The information stored in the digital picture files by the camera might be used by the online photo printing service during the printing process, for example, to adjust the color or sharpness of the image before it is printed. Information stored by digital picture management apps might be used by the online photo printing service to print as captions on the front or back of the print copy.

You can use Order Prints to choose which pictures to send and which service to use to print your pictures. Some picture management apps might be able to help you remove stored personal information before sending pictures to be printed.

You might also be able to edit the properties of the file to remove stored personal information. Windows helps apps and Windows features launch faster by keeping track of when and how frequently those apps and features are used and which system files they load.

When you use an app or Windows feature, Windows saves some information on your PC about the system files used as well as when and how frequently the app or feature was used.

Windows uses the information about app and feature usage to help apps and features launch faster. In some cases, apps may be automatically launched in a suspended state. Apps that are automatically launched and suspended appear in Task Manager and can be terminated.

While suspended, those apps cannot access your webcam or microphone until you launch them, even if you have previously enabled that functionality. If an incompatibility problem is found with a desktop app that you try to run, Program Compatibility Assistant will try to help you resolve it. If an incompatibility problem is found with an app you attempt to run, a report is generated that includes information such as the app name, app version, the needed compatibility settings, and your actions with the app so far.

Error reports are used to provide you with responses to problems that you report for your apps. Responses contain links when available to the app publisher’s website so you can learn more about possible solutions. Error reports created due to app failures are used to try to determine which setting to adjust when you encounter compatibility problems for the apps that you’re running on this version of Windows.

Information reported through CEIP is used to identify app compatibility problems. For problems reported through Windows Error Reporting, an error report is created only when you select the option to check online for a solution. Unless you have previously consented to report problems automatically so you can check for solutions, you’re asked if you want to send the error report. For more information, see the Windows Error Reporting section.

Properties are file information that allow you to quickly search and organize your files. Some properties are intrinsic to the file for example, the size of the file while others might be specific to an app or device for example, the settings of your camera when you took a photo or the location data recorded by the camera for the photo.

The type of information stored will depend upon the type of file and the apps that use it. Examples of properties include file name, date modified, file size, author, keywords, and comments. Properties are stored in the file, and they move with the file if it is moved or copied to another location, such as a file share, or sent as an email attachment.

Properties can help you more quickly search and organize your files. They can also be used by apps to perform app-specific tasks. You can edit or remove some properties for a file by selecting the file in File Explorer and clicking Properties.

For app-specific properties, you can edit or remove them only if the app used to generate the file supports these features. If your PC has near-field communication NFC hardware, you can physically tap it against another device or accessory with NFC hardware to share links, files, and other information.

There are two types of proximity connections: Tap and Do and Tap and Hold. With Tap and Hold, the connection is active only as long as the devices are held next to each other. When you tap proximity enabled devices together, they exchange information to establish a connection with each other. Windows can send files, links, and other information between devices using a proximity connection. Apps that use proximity can send and receive any information they have access to. This information might be sent through your network or Internet connection, or directly through a device-to-device wireless connection.

Network and PC information exchanged over a proximity connection is used to establish a network connection, and to identify the devices connecting to each other. Data transferred through a proximity connection initiated within an app can be used by that app in any way. Near field proximity service is on by default. An administrator can turn it off using the options provided in Devices and Printers in Control Panel. Windows Tap and Send makes it easy to share selected information with a friend standing next to you or with another one of your devices such as a mobile phone.

The next device you tap will receive a link to the webpage currently being displayed. This also works with any app that supports sharing information, such as pictures, text, or files. Tap and Send uses the information you’re sharing and the information described in the Near field proximity service section above. This information is only used to create the connection between the two devices.

If Near-field proximity service is turned on, Tap and Send is also turned on. For more information, see the Near-field proximity service section. VPN technologies allow users to connect to a private network, such as a corporate network, over the Internet. A Remote Access connections component, Dial-up Networking, allows you to access the Internet using a dial-up modem or broadband technology such as a cable modem or a digital subscriber line DSL.

The dialer components collect information from your PC such as your user name, password, and domain name. This information is sent to the system that you’re attempting to connect with. To help protect your privacy and the security of your PC, security-related information such as your user name and password are encrypted and stored on your PC.

Dialer information is used to help your PC connect to the Internet. A remote access server might keep the user name and IP address information for accounting and compliance purposes, but no information is sent to Microsoft.

For non-command-line dialers, you can choose to save your password by selecting Save this user name and password. You can clear that option at any time to delete the previously saved password from the dialer. Because this option is turned off by default, you might be prompted to provide your password to connect to the Internet or a network.

For command-line dialers like rasdial, there is no option to save your password. RemoteApp and Desktop Connections let you access apps and desktops on remote PCs that have been made available online for remote access.

When you enable a connection, configuration files are downloaded to your PC from the remote URL you specify. These configuration files link apps and desktops on remote PCs so that you can run them from your PC. Your PC will automatically check for and download updates to these configuration files periodically.

These apps run on remote PCs, and information you enter into the apps is transmitted across the network to the remote PCs you chose to connect with. If Microsoft is hosting the PC or app that you’re connecting to, additional information about your connection might be sent to Microsoft for support purposes.

Updates to configuration files might include settings changes including providing you with access to new apps; however, new apps will run only if you choose to run them. This feature also sends information to the remote PCs on which the remote apps run. No information is sent to Microsoft unless the remote connection is hosted by Microsoft. You can choose whether you want to use RemoteApp and Desktop Connections. You can also use your email address to retrieve the Connection URL.

You can remove a connection and its connection files by clicking Remove on the connections description dialog box. If you disconnect a connection without closing all open apps, these apps will remain open on the remote PC.

Remote Desktop connection provides a way for you to establish a remote connection with a host PC that is running Remote Desktop Services. These settings include the name of your domain and connection configuration settings, such as remote PC name, user name, display information, local device information, audio information, clipboard, connection settings, remote app names, and session icon or thumbnail.

Credentials for these connections, Remote Desktop Gateway credentials, and a list of trusted Remote Desktop Gateway server names are stored locally on your PC. A list is stored in the registry. This list is stored permanently unless it is deleted by an administrator. Information collected by Remote Desktop connection allows you to connect to host PCs running Remote Desktop Services using your preferred settings.

User name, password, and domain information are collected to allow you to save your connection settings and to enable you to double-click an RDP file or click a favorite to launch a connection without having to re-enter this information. You can choose if you want to use Remote Desktop connection. If you use it, your RDP files and Remote Desktop connection favorites contain information required to connect to a remote PC, including the options and settings that were configured when the connection was automatically saved.

You can customize RDP files and favorites, including files for connecting to the same PC with different settings. A Microsoft account formerly known as Windows Live ID is a single email address and password you can use to sign in to apps, sites, and services from Microsoft and select Microsoft partners.

You can sign up for a Microsoft account in Windows or on Microsoft websites that require you to sign in with a Microsoft account.

You can sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account or, on products that support it, choose to connect your local or domain account to a Microsoft account. If you do this, Windows can help make your PCs look and feel the same by automatically syncing settings and info in Windows and Microsoft apps. If you visit a website where you use a Microsoft account to sign in, Windows will also sign you in to that website automatically. If you already use that email address as a Microsoft account, you can use it and the password for the Microsoft account to sign in to Windows.

When you’re signed in to Windows with your Microsoft account or with a domain account connected to your Microsoft account:. Certain Windows settings will sync between the PCs that you sign in to with your Microsoft account. For more info about what settings are synced and how to control them, see the “Sync settings” section of this page. Microsoft apps that use a Microsoft account for authentication like Mail, Calendar, People, Microsoft Office, and other apps can automatically begin downloading your info for example, the Mail app will automatically download the messages sent to your Outlook.

Web browsers can automatically sign you in to websites that you sign in to with your Microsoft account for example, if you visit Bing.

Windows will ask your permission before allowing third-party apps to use profile information or other personal information associated with your Microsoft account. Because domain administrators are able to access any information on your PC, they’ll also be able to access any settings and info you’ve chosen to sync with other PCs through your Microsoft account. This can include settings such as name, account picture, and browser history.

When you create a new Microsoft account in Windows, we use the information you provide to create and help secure the account. To learn more about the privacy impact of having a Microsoft account, read the Microsoft account privacy statement.

For info about how individual Microsoft apps use information associated with your Microsoft account, see the privacy statements for each app. You can find the privacy statement for a Microsoft app by opening Settings from within the app, or in the About dialog.

Standard device information may be used to personalize certain communications to you, such as emails intended to help you get started with your device. When you sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, some settings are synced automatically. To learn how to change which Windows settings are synced or to stop syncing, see the “Sync settings” section of this page. To learn more about the data collected by Microsoft apps that use a Microsoft account for authentication, read their privacy statements.

On products that support it, you can create a local account or Microsoft account at any time in Accounts in PC settings. If you sign in to Windows with a domain account, you can connect or disconnect your Microsoft account at any time in Accounts in PC settings. During setup, if you choose to use OneDrive for cloud storage, Windows will automatically send content to Microsoft servers, including:.

You may also choose to save content on Microsoft servers, and apps may choose to select Microsoft servers as the default save location for your files.

Windows uses this content to provide the cloud storage service. Microsoft doesn’t use your content or information to identify, contact, or target advertising to you. You can change these settings at any time in the OneDrive section of PC settings.

When you sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, Windows syncs some of your settings and info with Microsoft servers to make it easier to have personalized experiences across multiple PCs. Settings you choose to sync will automatically update on Microsoft servers and your other PCs as you use them. If you choose to sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, Windows syncs certain settings with Microsoft servers. These settings include:.

Personalization settings such as your account picture, lock screen image, background, and mouse settings. To help protect your privacy, all synced settings are sent encrypted via SSL.

If you sign in to Windows with a domain account connected to a Microsoft account, settings and info you’ve chosen will sync to your domain account. Passwords that you save while signed into Windows with a domain account connected to a Microsoft account will never be synced. Because domain administrators can access any information on your PC, they’ll also be able to access any settings and info you’ve chosen to sync with other PCs through your Microsoft account.

Windows uses these settings and info to provide the syncing service. Microsoft doesn’t use your synced settings and info to identify, contact, or target advertising to you. When you sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, your settings sync by default. You can choose to sync your settings, and control what is synced, by going to Sync settings in the OneDrive section of PC settings. If you sign in to Windows with a domain account and you choose to connect that account to a Microsoft account, Windows will ask which settings you want to sync before connecting your Microsoft account.

Teredo Technology Teredo allows PCs and networks to communicate over multiple networking protocols. If you use an app that requires Teredo to use IPv6 connectivity, or if you configure your firewall to always enable IPv6 connectivity, then Teredo will periodically contact the Microsoft Teredo service over the Internet.

The only information sent to Microsoft is standard PC information and the name of the service requested for example, teredo. Once the service is located, information is sent to maintain a connection with the IPv6 service. Using the netsh command line tool, you can change the query that the service sends over the Internet to use non-Microsoft servers instead, or you can turn it off. Limited authorization values are created to perform typical administrative actions and standard user actions and are managed by Windows.

The file also contains the PC name, operating system version, creation user, and creation date information to assist you in recognizing the file. The private portion of the Endorsement Key is never exposed outside of the TPM, and once it has been created, it usually can’t be reset. Windows does provide an interface for third-party apps like antimalware software to use the Endorsement Key for certain TPM scenarios, such as Measured Boot with Attestation. For antimalware software the endorsement key and the endorsement key certificate also are useful to confirm boot measurements are provided by a TPM from a specific manufacturer.

By default, only administrators or apps with administrative rights can use the TPM endorsement key. You can choose to clear the TPM and reset it to factory defaults. Clearing the TPM removes owner information, and with the exception of the endorsement key, all TPM-based keys or cryptographic information that apps might have created when the TPM was in use.

Certificates are used primarily to verify the identity of a person or device, authenticate a service, or encrypt files. Trusted root certification authorities are the organizations that issue certificates.

Update Root Certificates contacts the online Windows Update service to see if Microsoft has added a certification authority to its list of trusted authorities, but only when an app is presented with a certificate issued by a certification authority that isn’t directly trusted a certificate that isn’t stored in a list of trusted certificates on your PC.

If the certification authority has been added to the Microsoft list of trusted authorities, its certificate will automatically be added to the list of trusted certificates on your PC. Update Root Certificates sends a request to the online Windows Update service that asks for the current list of root certification authorities in the Microsoft Root Certificate Program.

If the untrusted certificate is on the list, Update Root Certificates obtains that certificate from Windows Update and places it in the trusted certificate store on your PC. The information transferred includes the names and cryptographic hashes of root certificates. The information is used by Microsoft to update the list of trusted certificates on your PC. Update Root Certificates is turned on by default. Windows Update is a service that provides you with software updates for Windows software and other supporting software, such as drivers supplied by device manufacturers.

Microsoft Update is a service that provides you with software updates for Windows software, as well as other Microsoft software such as Microsoft Office. The Update Services collect info from your PC that allows Microsoft to operate and improve the services, such as:. The Microsoft software and other supporting software e. This helps us determine which updates are appropriate for you.

Plug and Play ID numbers of hardware devices — a code assigned by the device manufacturer that identifies the device e. BIOS name, revision number, vendor, and revision date — info about the set of essential software routines that test your hardware, start the operating system on your PC, and transfer data among hardware devices connected to your PC.

You can use these Update Services by going to Windows Update in Control Panel and checking for updates or changing your settings to allow Windows to automatically install updates as they become available recommended. Within the Windows Update feature, you can choose whether to opt in to Microsoft Update.

If the software runs, it will remove the malware listed on the Microsoft Support website. During a Malware check, a report will be sent to Microsoft with specific info about malware detected, errors, and other info about your PC.

The data sent to Microsoft is used to operate and maintain the Update Services. It is also used to generate aggregate statistics that help us analyze trends and improve our products and services, including the Update Services. To generate aggregate statistics, the update services use the GUID collected by the Update Services to track and record the number of individual computers that use the Update Services, and whether the download and installation of specific updates succeeds or fails.

The Update Services record the GUID of the computer that attempted the download and installation, the ID of the item that was requested, whether updates were available, and standard computer information.

The MSRT information described above is used to help improve our anti-malware and other security products and services. No information in the MSRT reports will be used to identify or contact you.

If you turn on the Update Services, in order for them to properly function some software components on your system that make up or are directly related to the Update Services will need to be updated from time to time. These updates must be performed before the service can check for, download, or install other updates. These required updates fix errors, provide ongoing improvements, and maintain compatibility with the Microsoft servers that support the service.

Software updates required to install or update Windows Store apps will be downloaded and installed automatically. These updates must be performed for apps to function properly. A token is similar to a cookie. It stores information in a small file that is placed on your hard disk by the Update Services server, and is used when your computer connects to the Update Services server to maintain a valid connection.

It is stored on your computer only, not on the server. This cookie or token contains information such as last scan time in order to find the most recently available updates.

 
 

How To Enable Multiple RDP Sessions on Windows Server – TecAdmin – Navigation menu

 
 

Here you can also learn about the latest tools we provide to access and control your data and how to contact us if you have a privacy inquiry. Uses of information. These highlights of the full Windows 8.

They focus on online features and aren’t intended to be an exhaustive description. They don’t apply to other online or offline Microsoft sites, products, or services. Statement , which is the full Windows 8. Features supplement , which describes the features that have privacy impact in Windows 8. Apps supplement , which describes the apps that have privacy impact in Windows 8. Server supplement , which describes the additional features that have privacy impact in Windows Server R2.

For more information on how to help protect your PC, your personal information, and your family online, visit our Safety and Security Center. Certain Windows features may ask you for permission to collect or use information from your PC, including personal information. Windows uses this information as outlined in the full Windows 8.

Windows requires activation to reduce software piracy and help ensure that our customers receive the software quality they expect. Activation sends some information about your PC to Microsoft. If you choose to sign in to Windows with a Microsoft account, Windows will sync your settings across devices and automatically sign you in to some apps and websites.

Windows does not require you to sign in with a Microsoft account to access third-party email or social network services, but if that third party offers an app through the Store, you must sign in to the Store with a Microsoft account to install the app.

Additional details. Windows offers you a variety of ways to control how Windows features transfer information over the Internet. More information about how to control these features is in the Features Supplement , Apps Supplement and the Server Supplement. To help improve your experience, some features that use the Internet are turned on by default. We use the information collected to enable the features you’re using or provide the services you request.

We also use it to improve our products and services. In order to help provide our services, we occasionally provide information to other companies that work on our behalf. Only companies who have a business need to use the information are provided access to them. These companies are required to keep this information confidential and are prohibited from using it for any other purpose. For more information about our privacy practices, go to the full Windows 8.

Or, you can write to us using our web form. Collection and use of your information. Collection and use of information about your computer. Security of your information. Changes to this privacy statement. For more information. Internet Explorer Microsoft Error Reporting Service. Microsoft Online. Windows Media Center. Windows Media Player. Windows 7. Windows Server Essentials. This statement covers Windows 8.

Certain Windows components have their own privacy statements, which are also listed on this page. Privacy statements for software and services related to Windows and for prior releases are also listed there. For information about specific features, please refer to the Features supplement , the Apps supplement , and the Server supplement. This is a statement that focuses on features that communicate with the Internet and isn’t intended to be an exhaustive list.

The personal information we collect from you will be used by Microsoft and its controlled subsidiaries and affiliates to enable the features you use and provide the services or carry out the transactions you have requested or authorized. The information may also be used to analyze and improve Microsoft products and services. Except as described in this statement, personal information you provide won’t be transferred to third parties without your consent.

We occasionally hire other companies to provide limited services on our behalf, such as for performing statistical analysis of our services. We will only provide those companies the personal information they need to deliver the service, and they are prohibited from using that information for any other purpose.

Microsoft may access or disclose information about you, including the content of your communications, in order to: a comply with the law or respond to lawful requests or legal process; b protect the rights or property of Microsoft or our customers, including the enforcement of our agreements or policies governing your use of the software; or c act on a good faith belief that such access or disclosure is necessary to protect the personal safety of Microsoft employees, customers, or the public.

Information collected by or sent to Microsoft by Windows 8. Microsoft abides by the safe harbor framework as set forth by the U. Department of Commerce regarding the collection, use, and retention of data from the European Union, the European Economic Area, and Switzerland. When you use software with Internet enabled features, information about your computer “standard computer information” is sent to the websites you visit and online services you use.

Standard computer information typically includes information such as your IP address, operating system version, browser version, and regional and language settings. In some cases, it may also include a hardware ID, which indicates the device manufacturer, device name, and version. If a particular feature or service sends information to Microsoft, standard computer information will be sent as well. The privacy details for each Windows feature in the Features Supplement, the Apps Supplement, and the Server Supplement, and the features listed elsewhere on this page, describe what additional information is collected and how it is used.

Administrators can use Group Policy to modify many of the settings for the features described here. For more information, see this white paper for administrators. Microsoft is committed to helping protect the security of your information. We use a variety of security technologies and procedures to help protect your information from unauthorized access, use, or disclosure. For example, we store the information you provide on computer systems with limited access, which are located in controlled facilities.

When we transmit highly confidential information such as a credit card number or password over the Internet, we protect it through the use of encryption, such as the Secure Socket Layer SSL protocol. We will occasionally update this privacy statement to reflect changes in our products, services, and customer feedback.

When we post changes, we will revise the “last updated” date at the top of this statement. If there are material changes to this statement or in how Microsoft will use your personal information, we will notify you either by posting a notice of such changes prior to implementing the change or by directly sending you a notification. We encourage you to periodically review this statement to be informed of how Microsoft is protecting your information. Microsoft welcomes your comments regarding this privacy statement.

If you have questions about this statement, or believe that we haven’t adhered to it, you can write to us using our web form. BitLocker Drive Encryption. Device discovery and setup.

Ease of Access Center. Handwriting personalization—automatic learning. Internet connection sharing. Language preferences. Manage your credentials. Name and account picture. Notifications, lock screen apps, and tile updates. Prefetching and Prelaunching. Program Compatibility Assistant. Remote Access connections.

RemoteApp and Desktop Connections. Remote Desktop connection. Sign in with a Microsoft account. OneDrive cloud storage. Update Root Certificates. Virtual Private Networking.

Windows Defender. Windows Error Reporting. Windows File Association. Windows Help. Remote Assistance. Windows Search. Windows Setup. Windows Share. Windows SmartScreen. Windows Speech Recognition. Windows Store.

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